ALONE

You can’t escape the past when a part of you dies with it 

Packed with strategic jump scares, ‘Alone’ simultaneously upholds a strong story that keeps the audience shocked until the last scene. It is a physiological horror film that, that plays on unique connection twins can have and the superstition that one may lose the best ‘part’ while separating two bodies that perhaps have only one soul. Flashbacks between the twins past and Ploy’s present, keeps the audience sympathy for Pim until it’s revealed she is really Ploy.  

 

Moments from the twins past are sporadically revealed throughout the film, pacing the terrifying present with the building story of the twins childhood. It is an intellectual horror film that provides layers of emotions outside of the a ghost jumping through the screen. The idea for the remake is to maintain the appeal of a “Thai-horror” in an international commercial film. The idea is to maintain an Asian cast - but American, for instance - and set the story somewhere in Boston (Northern East Coast) to establish an Asian family (immigrants) who own a successful dry cleaning empire. While in the original film, two actresses play Siamese twins, the remake would cast one strong lead: Constance Wu, the lead in “Crazy Rich Asian” (or perhaps as an alternative Lana Condor).

 

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Pim and Ploy are inseparable twins, emotionally and physically.. born conjoined at the stomach. Pim is the loving, protective sister of Ploy who is quiet and dependent on her other half. Sharing a unique sisterly bond, they are each other’s best friend and vow to stay together until death. But this vow is broken when Pim develops a crush on a boy, Wee, who is staying in the same children’s hospital.  

 

Wee becomes friends with the girls after he sketches a picture of them, but his feelings are only for one. As Wee show’s more attention Pim, Ploy becomes increasingly jealous. When Wee leaves the hospital Pim begs Ploy to stand up so she can say goodbye, but she refuses. Finally fed up with her sister, Pim demands to be separated. But during the surgery, Ploy dies. Riddled with guilt, Pim blames herself for the death of her sister.

 

Years later, Pim has started a new life with her boyfriend Wee in Korea. She celebrates her birthday, when she receives news that her mother is dying. After she returns to Thailand with Wee, Ploy’s angry spirit is waiting for her there. Pim is haunted by her dead twin. She hears Ploy’s breath next to her in bed. She sees her in the mirrors and looming over her, terrorising her. Wee seeks psychiatric help for Pim, but her ‘hullucinations’ persist and become more aggressive. Pim lays in a bathtub, when Ploy’s hands come up and hold her underwater. She begins to break, her guilt and fear intensifying. Soon Wee begins seeing Ploy too, resting her head on Pim as if still attached her.  
The psychiatrist advises Wee to leave Thailand and to remove Pim from her haunting childhood memories. Wee goes to the hospital to transfer Pim’s mother to Korea, when she reveals to him that Ploy never died. Pim did.  

 

When Pim demanded to be separated, Ploy strangles her to death out of rage and jealousy. Pim devastated, lays on the operating table as her favoured half is removed. Her mother disowns her and Ploy becomes Pim to finally be with Wee. She admits to everything when Wee confronts her after Ploy’s failed attempt of killing her mother to hide the truth. Wee disgusted, rejects Ploy. 

Ploy unable to accept rejection and understand how she is any different from her dead sister, she knocks Wee unconscious and ties him up. After a battle of survival, the twins house is set ablaze. Wee escapes, while Ploy is trapped inside. Pim’s ghost holding her down until the flames swallow her. Pim finally gets revenge on her evil other half.

    © 2019 by carte blanche International.